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Visiting Info
Opening Hours:

Sunday to Wednesday: 09:00-17:00
Thursday: 9:00-20:00 *
Fridays and Holiday eves: 09:00-14:00.

Yad Vashem is closed on Saturdays and all Jewish Holidays.

* The Holocaust History Museum, Museum of Holocaust Art, Exhibitions Pavilion and Synagogue are open until 20:00. All other sites close at 17:00.

Drive to Yad Vashem:
For more Visiting Information click here

Avner Shalev

Avner Shalev

Since 1993, Avner Shalev has been Chairman of Yad Vashem, the World Holocaust Remembrance Center. He established the Museums Complex, including the Holocaust History Museum, for which he serves as chief curator and founded Yad Vashem's International School for Holocaust Studies.  He also serves as chief curator of Yad Vashem's permanent exhibition in the Auschwitz-Birkenau State Museum's Jewish Pavilion.

Yad Vashem Chairman Remarks in Austria

Earlier this week, Yad Vashem Chairman Avner Shalev spoke in the Austrian Parliament, at a special event dedicated to the importance of Holocaust remembrance and education, and to the Austrian Friends of Yad Vashem.  Barbara Prammer, President of the National Council of Austria and Honorary Chairperson of the Austrian Friends of Yad Vashem opened the event, which coincided with the anniversary of the Anschluss, a German word meaning connection or annexation that is used to refer to... Read More Here

Address by Avner Shalev, Chairman of the Yad Vashem Directorate

Shalom. I am truly moved as we approach the conclusion of our conference. After listening to what has been said here this morning, I have decided to put aside the text that I had prepared and share some observations with you. The reason that I am so excited about talking with you at the conclusion of this session is the fact that at least one major goal that we had dreamed of eventually achieving when we originally commenced our educational efforts at Yad Vashem, has now come to... Read More Here

Preserving Memories for Posterity

I am often asked how Yad Vashem intends to preserve the memory of the Holocaust after those who survived its horrors are no longer with us. This question is informed by the apt perception that when Holocaust survivors share their stories with others, they serve as living testament to the Shoah's events and implications, thus strengthening the moral dimension of our commemoration endeavors. Preserving the memory of the Holocaust and its relevance for future generations will always be contingent... Read More Here

Farwell to a dear friend and an exemplary son of the Jewish People

This week, we mourn the death of Elie Wiesel, z"l. His passing not only saddens and fills us with a sense of loss. It also constitutes a painful milestone in the gradual transition to an era and world lacking live personal Shoah testimony.Elie was an exceptionally gifted witness of the Holocaust, remarkably articulating and communicating its haunting messages. An exemplary son of the Jewish people, he came to represent, embody and nurture its amazingly durable and resilient creative forces,... Read More Here

Making Collective Remembrance Personal

Imparting memory has always been an integral component of Jewish tradition. The commandment to remember and pass on formative events in our history to the next generation is a religious obligation, reinforcing faith and establishing tradition. During the 2,000 years of our Diaspora, Jews suffered terrible abuse, violent blood libels and murderous pogroms that left thousands dead, and scores of communities decimated. For generations, lost individuals were memorialized by their families, while... Read More Here

If Everything is Genocide

Recently, yet another Hamas spokesperson compared the situation in Gaza to events during the Holocaust. Coming from an official who represents a body that unabashedly declares its commitment to terrorism and the destruction of Israel, this is in itself not surprising. Echoed last week by Libya's deputy UN Ambassador Ibrahim Dabbashi in a meeting of the UN Security Council a body whose members are officially dedicated to maintaining peace such assessments are even more distressing. The... Read More Here

They Chose to Rebuild

At the end of World War II, thousands of Jews who had survived Nazi persecution attempted to reach the shores of this country. Many were thwarted by the British, and interned once again behind barbed wire. Others were more successful: slipping in under cover of darkness, to become an inseparable part of the Jewish community in Eretz Israel (Mandatory Palestine). But six decades ago, the doors of the country were finally flung open and hundreds of thousands of Holocaust survivors streamed in.... Read More Here

From the Chairman - Avner Shalev

Three generations have come into being since the end of World War II. The generation that lived through the Holocaust is dwindling. The presence of witnesses – the remnant who survived – has always ensured a certain moral strength; their increasing absence creates a moral, cultural and educational vacuum. How will Holocaust commemoration remain relevant to members of the fourth and fifth generations, both Jewish and non-Jewish? What place will it occupy when the survivor generation is no... Read More Here

If everything is genocide…

Recently, yet another Hamas spokesperson compared the situation in Gaza to events during the Holocaust. Coming from an official representing a body that unabashedly declares its commitment to terrorism and the destruction of Israel, this is in itself not surprising. Echoed this week by Libya’s deputy UN Ambassador Ibrahim Dabbashi in a meeting of the UN Security Council, a body whose members are apparently dedicated to maintaining peace, such assessments are even more distressing. The... Read More Here

Mission Statement

Three generations have come into being since the end of World War II. The generation that lived through the Holocaust is dwindling. The presence of witnesses – the remnant who survived – has always ensured a certain moral strength; their increasing absence creates a moral, cultural and educational vacuum. How will Holocaust commemoration remain relevant to members of the fourth and fifth generations, both Jewish and non-Jewish? What place will it occupy when the survivor generation is no... Read More Here