EHRI Newsletter - Fourth Issue, March 2015

e-Newsletter for Experts in Holocaust Documentation

Welcome to the fourth issue of the e-Newsletter for Experts in Holocaust Documentation, facilitated and developed as part of the European Holocaust Research Infrastructure (EHRI). The aim of the newsletter is to share and disseminate knowledge and new insights, and to organize a continuous exchange of knowledge and views between experts in methodological fields of Holocaust research. This newsletter represents an additional complementary networking channel to the Expert Workshop, "Holocaust Art – an Essential Tool for the Methodology of Constructing a Historical Narrative".

We hope you find this issue interesting and resourceful, and we look forward to your feedback.


Issue in Focus – Holocaust Art

The Sticky Spot of Crime - Rethinking Art History in Poland - Luiza Nader

Holocaust by Bullets: Expanding the Field of Holocaust ArtThe attention of modern art histories in Poland is rarely given to the 1939-1945 period, and when it is it focuses on art and artists facing World War II and the German occupation rather than the Holocaust. In art history narrations from the 1970s and '80s the Shoah is absent and in more contemporary art histories either it does not have a central place but is merely a distant point of reference, or it is relegated to the sphere of specialized studies.

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Holocaust by Bullets: Expanding the Field of Holocaust Art
- Roma Sendyka

Holocaust by Bullets: Expanding the Field of Holocaust ArtToday we know more and more of how profoundly the “dispersed Holocaust” – the uncountable atrocities of individual deaths in towns, villages, narrow streets of lesser ghettos - left its mark on the region, leaving “bloodlands”, “shattered spaces” and “tainted landscapes” behind. But did it leave art?
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Are There Boundaries to Artistic Representations of the Holocaust? -Franziska Reiniger

Are There Boundaries to Artistic Representations of the Holocaust?Artistic representation of the Holocaust has become a matter of controversy. This article discusses various controversies regarding the limitations to the artistic representation of the Holocaust.

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Looted Art

Outlining the Kümmel Report: Between German Nationality and Aesthetics - Shlomit Steinberg

Preventing Digital DecayIn 1939, already well advanced in its campaign to conquer Europe, the German Reich was about to take action to heal a deep wound in the nation's pride, a wound that festered and grew as an outcome of what was conceived as a chain of insults inflicted upon the German Nation through recurring thefts of art work through the ages. A relatively obscure document, the Kümmel Report, demonstrated how Germany intended to repossess what was perceived as rightfully hers and had been taken away by various warring nations.

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Events

Holocaust Art – an Essential Tool for the Methodology of Constructing a Historical Narrative

Yad Vashem hosted an international workshop in the framework of the European Holocaust Research Infrastructure in Jerusalem on 9-11 February 2015. Through an array of approaches, the workshop examined subjective and objective inherent qualities of artistic manifestation, affording a vantage point to history not provided by any other tool. Art curators, art historians and researchers explored the role of the visual arts in the attempt to build a historical Holocaust narrative.

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Additional Resources for Holocaust Art


Additional Resources for Looted Art



 
The project European Holocaust Research Infrastructure (EHRI) is financed by FP7 (the 7th Framework Programme for Research and Technological Development) of the European Union.