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Commemoration of Jewish Victims

Tombstone for the Jewish men of Ozarintsy murdered in the summer of 1941 Tombstone for the Jewish men of Ozarintsy murdered in the summer of 1941 YVA Photo Collection 6637 Memorial to the Holocaust victims of Ozarintsy. Photo by Eugene Shnaider, 2012  Memorial to the Holocaust victims of Ozarintsy. Photo by Eugene Shnaider, 2012 Genesis Philanthropy Group project Stella commemorating the Holocaust victims from Ozarintsy
Photo by Eugene Shnaider, 2012 Stella commemorating the Holocaust victims from Ozarintsy
Photo by Eugene Shnaider, 2012
Genesis Philanthropy Group project

A short time after the murder of the first group of Jewish men at the Polish cemetery near Ozarintsy, their bodies were reburied by their relatives at the Jewish cemetery in the town. Soon after the liberation of Ozarintsy by the Red Army a tombstone topped by a Star of David was erected over their mass grave. The Hebrew inscription on this tombstone includes a quotation from the Bible, the 2nd Book of Samuel, chapter 1, verse 23:."Lovely and pleasant...and in their death they were not divided"; they were murdered by the Hitlerites on the 20th of the month of Menakhem Av of 5701 and these are their names..." The names of the victims are listed on the tombstone in both Russian and Hebrew letters.
Later on another monument commemorating the Holocaust victims from Ozarintsy was erected in the center of the town, with funds contributed by survivors. In 1994 this monument was reconstructed. It now consists of a stella and a memorial stone. The stella has the torso of a human figure behind barbed wire and the carving of a menorah. The Ukrainian inscription on the stella says: "To the victims of the Fascist genocide 1941-1944." The inscription on the memorial stone, also in Ukrainian, says: "In July 1941 79 Jews of Ozarintsy village were shot and slaughtered by the German-Romanian occupiers. The shootings continued until March 1944. Dozens of the town's residents and refugees from Bessarabia and Bukovina died from disease, hunger, and the abuse of the occupiers."