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Commemoration of Jewish Victims

Dedication of the monument to the victims of the Holocaust at the Jewish cemetery of Bratslav, late 1980s or early 1990s Dedication of the monument to the victims of the Holocaust at the Jewish cemetery of Bratslav, late 1980s or early 1990s Monument to the Holocaust victims at the Jewish cemetery of Bratslav. Photo by Eugene Shnaider, 2012 Monument to the Holocaust victims at the Jewish cemetery of Bratslav. Photo by Eugene Shnaider, 2012 Genesis Philanthropy Group project Monument erected in the 1970s at the former Pechora camp. Photo by Eugene Shnaider, 2008-2012 Monument erected in the 1970s at the former Pechora camp. Photo by Eugene Shnaider, 2008-2012 Genesis Philanthropy Group project Monument at the former Pechora camp Monument at the former Pechora camp Yad Vashem Photo Collection 7823/1 Monument commemorating the Holocaust victims of the Vinnitsa area and of Bukovina and Bessarabia near the former Pechora death camp. Photo by Eugene Shnaider, 2008 or 2012 Monument commemorating the Holocaust victims of the Vinnitsa area and of Bukovina and Bessarabia near the former Pechora death camp. Photo by Eugene Shnaider, 2008 or 2012 Genesis Philanthropy Group project Monument to the Jewish children who perished in the Pechora death camp. Photo by Eugene Shnaider, 2012 Monument to the Jewish children who perished in the Pechora death camp. Photo by Eugene Shnaider, 2012 Genesis Philanthropy Group project

In the late 1980s or early 1990s a monument to commemorate the Holocaust victims from Bratslav was erected at the new Jewish cemetery of the town where, in addition to the bodies of Jews from Bratslav, the remains of young Jews shot near Grinenki village were also buried. The Russian inscription says: "To the bright memory of the residents of Bratslav who were brutally tortured to death in the German-Fascist concentration camps of Bratslav and Pechora 1941-1944." In the post-Soviet period a Star of David was placed at the top of the monument.
Toward the end of the Soviet period a memorial plaque was attached to the building of the Pechora village sanatorium, which functioned as a death camp during the war. The Ukrainian inscription on the plaque there says: "A fascist death camp was situated in the village of Pechora, Tulchin County, on the territory of the former Potocki estate during the years of the German-Fascist occupation 1941-1944. Thousands of Soviet people perished there.". Later, after the fall of the Soviet Union, the text of this inscription was changed and now, in Ukrainian, it says: "The Fascist death camp 'The Loop' for the Jewish population, where tens of thousands of innocent women, men, [and] children were killed, was situated at this place during the years of the German-Fascist occupation of 1941-1944."
In 1970s a monument was erected in Pechora by Holocaust survivor Mikhail Malin at the site the where inmates of Pechora camp were murdered. The rectangular monument topped by the half-figure of a mourning woman has plaques with inscriptions in Hebrew and Russian. The Hebrew inscription translates as follows: "Memorial stone. Here are buried victims who were martyred in various ways by the Fascist murderers, whose hands were full of blood: 8,000 men, women, and children [were murdered] between 1941 and 1944 in the village camp of Pechora. May the Lord our God remember them for good and may the blood of His servants be avenged." The Russian inscription translates as follows: "Human being, give thought to these thousands of unfortunate people who did not live to see Victory. The German-Fascist executioners and their policemen [accomplices] brutally cut short the breath, the voice, the thoughts, and the lives of these women, children, and elderly people. Their deaths cannot be described in words. They are your mothers and fathers, your brothers and sisters, who perished for the sake of all that to which you owe your new life. Do not be overcome by suffering but be filled with hatred and swear that you will not permit the repetition of such victimization. Preserve their bright memory through your descendants. Do not forget - this was their last wish... "
Subsequently several monuments were erected near this monuments by organizations of Holocaust survivors and also by individuals to commemorate their dear ones murdered in the Pechora camp. The Russian inscription on one of these monuments says: "Here are buried eight thousand [sic] Soviet people who were killed during the German occupation of 1941-1945." In the late 1990s the Mogilev-Podolsk Committee of the Children Prisoners of Fascism slightly changed the inscription on the plaque. The Russian words now say: "Here are buried eight thousand [sic] Soviet peaceful residents of Jewish origin who were shot or starved to death during the period of the German occupation, 1941-1945." The Ukrainian inscription on another small monument toppled by the Star of David reads: "To the thousands of innocent Jews of the Vinnitsa area, Bukovina [and] Bessarabia who were consumed in the fire of the Holocaust (1941-1944). May their hearts shine eternally, illuminating for the generations to come the Path of Memory". Recently a monument with a Star of David and a Menorah and images of children was erected to commemorate the Jewish children who perished in the Pechora camp.
Holocaust survivor Lev Muchnik from Bratslav erected a small monument in the form of a gravestone to commemorate his father Isaak, his brother Aron, and his sister Manya, who all perished in the Pechora camp. The plaque on this monument has pictures of Isaak and Manya Muchnik and the names of the three members of the Muchnik family with the years of their birth and death.
Video
Roman Davidzon was born in 1937 in Bratslav and lived there during the war years (Interview in Russian)
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Roman Davidzon was born in 1937 in Bratslav and lived there during the war years (Interview in Russian)
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