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Commemoration of Jewish Victims

Monument erected in the 1950s at the murder site of the Ashkenazi Jews of Karasubazar
Photo by Mikhail Tyaglyy, 2011 Monument erected in the 1950s at the murder site of the Ashkenazi Jews of Karasubazar
Photo by Mikhail Tyaglyy, 2011
The International Institute for Holocaust Research at Yad Vashem Monument erected in the 1960s at the burial site of the Krymchaks and other civilians
Photo by Mikhail Tyaglyy, 2011 Monument erected in the 1960s at the burial site of the Krymchaks and other civilians
Photo by Mikhail Tyaglyy, 2011
The International Institute for Holocaust Research at Yad Vashem Monument erected by the Krymchak community in the 1990s 
Photo by Mikhail Tyaglyy, 2011 Monument erected by the Krymchak community in the 1990s
Photo by Mikhail Tyaglyy, 2011
The International Institute for Holocaust Research at Yad Vashem Symbolic gravestone in the area of the former Krymchak cemetery
Photo by Mikhail Tyaglyy, 2011 Symbolic gravestone in the area of the former Krymchak cemetery
Photo by Mikhail Tyaglyy, 2011
The International Institute for Holocaust Research at Yad Vashem Symbolic gravestone  erected after 2000 at the Krymchak cemetery that had been partly reconstructed by the Krymchak community.
Photo by Mikhail Tyaglyy, 2011 Symbolic gravestone erected after 2000 at the Krymchak cemetery that had been partly reconstructed by the Krymchak community.
Photo by Mikhail Tyaglyy, 2011
The International Institute for Holocaust Research at Yad Vashem

A monument was erected at the murder and burial site of local Ashkenazi Jews by the Soviet government after the war, probably in the 1950s. The monument has a white pillar rising from two white steps and is topped with a red star. On the plaque is a Russian inscription that says: "Eternal memory to the victims of the Fascist Terror, 1941-1944."
The first monument at the burial site of the Krymchak Jews (as well as the murder site of other civilians and o partisans) was erected by the Soviet authorities probably in the late 1950s or early 1960s. In the center of this monument was a 2-meter high statute of a woman made of duralumin; the women was holding flowers. There was no reference to the fact that some of the victims were Krymchaks. This monument was vandalized and the statue was stolen.
Another Soviet monument was erected probably in the 1960s on the other side of the anti-tank trench. Three white steps lead to a white pillar. On a black marble plaque is a Russian text that reads as follows: "Eternal memory to the Soviet civilians who were murdered by the German-Fascist occupiers 1941-1942."
A second monument at the burial site of the Krymchaks was erected by the Krymchak community in the early 1990s. The stone base of the monument, led up by two steps, is topped by a black marble stone with an image of a mourning Krymchak in the center. The Russian inscription on the stone plaque with red marble margins says:
"In this trench, alongside other Soviet civilians, rest Krymchaks, 468 Krymchak civilian residents of Karasubazar who were murdered in Fascist gas vans on January 17-18, 1942."
The metal chains around the monument have been looted more than once. According to a tradition in Belogorsk, on their wedding day many couples lay flowers on the monument. Local elementary school students visit the site when they learn about the war.
During the 1990s a symbolic gravestone, in the shape of a horizontal black marble plaque, that commemorates the murdered Krymchaks was erected by the Krymchak community in the area of the former Krymchak cemetery (Adzhimalia) that had been destroyed by the Soviet authorities after the war. Its Russian inscription reads as follows: "This is the place of grief and sorrow...." The two last lines are illegible.
A second symbolic gravestone was erected after the year 2000 at the Krymchak cemetery that had been partly reconstructed by the community with the assistance of Krymchak archeologist Prof. Achkinazi. The monument in the shape of a house is made of marble. In the center is the image of an overturned cradle, symbolizing the tragic end of the Krymchak community. The Russian inscription that says:
"To the Krymchaks of Karasubazar, 1517-1942" is followed by several words in the Krymchak language [perhaps the same as the Russian text].
Video
Contemporary view of the monument erected by the Krymchak community.
To view - click here
Contemporary view of the monument erected by the Krymchak community.
Video by Mikhail Tyaglyy, 2011
The International Institute for Holocaust Research at Yad Vashem
Audio
Yakov Mangupli, the last Krymchak of Belogorsk, was born in Belogorsk (Karasubazar) in 1954, recounts about the commemoration of the Krymchak Jews
To listen - click here
Yakov Mangupli, the last Krymchak of Belogorsk, was born in Belogorsk (Karasubazar) in 1954, recounts about the commemoration of the Krymchak Jews
Interview by Mikhail Tyaglyy, 2011
The International Institute for Holocaust Research at Yad Vashem