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Commemoration of Jewish Victims

Memorial to the Jewish inmates of the Berdichev ghetto Memorial to the Jewish inmates of the Berdichev ghetto YVA, Photo Collection 1515/2 Page from the Book of Deuteronomy, from Berdichev
Alongside is a list of names of local Holocaust victims, as well as of Jews from Berdichev who were killed during World War II. Page from the Book of Deuteronomy, from Berdichev
Alongside is a list of names of local Holocaust victims, as well as of Jews from Berdichev who were killed during World War II.
Donated to Yad Vashem by the President of Ukraine Viktor Yushchenko
Yad Vashem, Museums Division, Artifacts Collection
Memorial to the Jewish victims, in the area of the Historical Cultural Reserve
Photo by Mikhail Tyaglyy, 2015 Memorial to the Jewish victims, in the area of the Historical Cultural Reserve
Photo by Mikhail Tyaglyy, 2015
The International Institute for Holocaust Research at Yad Vashem Memorial to the Jewish victims near Shlemarka, photographed in the 1990s Memorial to the Jewish victims near Shlemarka, photographed in the 1990s YVA, Photo Collection 3125/3 Memorial to the Jewish victims, near Shlemarka (today Lyubomirka) village. Contemporary view
Photo by Mikhail Tyaglyy, 2015 Memorial to the Jewish victims, near Shlemarka (today Lyubomirka) village. Contemporary view
Photo by Mikhail Tyaglyy, 2015
The International Institute for Holocaust Research at Yad Vashem Stone with a map of the Jewish victims' mass graves in the vicinity of Berdichev 
Photo by Mikhail Tyaglyy, 2015 Stone with a map of the Jewish victims' mass graves in the vicinity of Berdichev
Photo by Mikhail Tyaglyy, 2015
The International Institute for Holocaust Research at Yad Vashem One of the five memorial stones marking the Shlemarka murder site
Photo by Mikhail Tyaglyy, 2015 One of the five memorial stones marking the Shlemarka murder site
Photo by Mikhail Tyaglyy, 2015
The International Institute for Holocaust Research at Yad Vashem Memorial stone that marks the mass grave in the vicinity of Radyanske village
Photo by Mikhail Tyaglyy, 2015 Memorial stone that marks the mass grave in the vicinity of Radyanske village
Photo by Mikhail Tyaglyy, 2015
The International Institute for Holocaust Research at Yad Vashem Memorial to the Jewish victims at Sokulino (today  Mirnyy village)
Photo by Mikhail Tyaglyy, 2015 Memorial to the Jewish victims at Sokulino (today Mirnyy village)
Photo by Mikhail Tyaglyy, 2015
The International Institute for Holocaust Research at Yad Vashem Memorial to  the Jewish victims, between the villages  of Khazhin and Bystrik
Photo by Mikhail Tyaglyy, 2015 Memorial to the Jewish victims, between the villages of Khazhin and Bystrik
Photo by Mikhail Tyaglyy, 2015
The International Institute for Holocaust Research at Yad Vashem

After the liberation of Berdichev on January 5, 1944, the Soviet Extraordinary State Commission opened the mass graves on the Berdichev-Vinnitsa Road, as well as ones along the Raigorodok Road.
Jews who returned to Berdichev from the Soviet interior revived Jewish life in the city. The Jewish community raised the idea of constructing a monument at the main murder site near the airfield. The municipal authorities opposed this initiative and, in 1946 the chairman of the Jewish community, Metler, was ordered to give up the plan.
Instead of a large monument, the Jews of Berdichev placed several symbolic stones to the Holocaust victims at the Jewish cemetery. In early 1953, after considerable efforts, the Jewish community was allowed to erect a monument at the Holocaust victims’ burial place in Shlemarka. This monument disappeared a short time later.
After Stalin’s death the Jewish religious community resumed its efforts to erect a monument, and informal fundraising was organized. In 1958 the monument was ready. It had both Yiddish and Russian inscriptions. The Russian inscription omitted any reference to the fact that the victims were Jewish. The remaining problem was obtaining approval for placing the monument close to the military airfield. After long negotiations, the commander of the airbase issued an order allowing the Jewish religious community to erect the monument on the airfield. However Party authorities, probably those in Kiev, revoked this order. The monument was placed in the Jewish cemetery. In the 1970s some Jews succeeded in infiltrating the territory of the airbase to read the Kaddish memorial prayer. It is likely that the guard saw them, but took no action.
In the post-Soviet era two monuments were erected at the site of the former ghetto [in Yatki], dedicated both to the Berdichev ghetto inmates and also to the Ukrainian gentiles who saved Jewish lives during World War II. The first bears an inscription in Ukrainian and Yiddish: “In 1941 in this area there was a Jewish ghetto, from which 30,000 Jews from Berdichev, shot by Fascists, departed for ever.” The second bears the following inscription in Ukrainian: “Whoever saves a life is considered as if he saved an entire world[a quotation from the Mishna]. The Jewish people will never forget your honorable deeds and will carry your names from generation to generation as an example of the highest humanity and harmony between our peoples. To the Righteous Among the Nations, from the Jewish community of Berdichev.”
Also in the 1990s, two monuments were erected on the territory of a local historical reserve and at the airfield murder site (Shlemarka). The monument on the territory of reserve(a former monastery) bears an inscription in Ukrainian that says: “Here lie 960 Soviet civilians – victims of the German-Fascist terror of 1941-1943.”
The memorial at the Shlemarka murder site bears a Russian inscription that says: “In this area 18,640 innocent Soviet civilians were brutally tortured and shot to death by the Hitlerist invaders in September 1941. Eternal memory to the victims of Fascism.” The number of victims indicated on the monument is the Soviet Extraordinary State Commission’s estimate for the total number of Jews murdered in Shlemarka, Sokulino, and Khazhin. The memorial is not located exactly at the murder site. Later, a stone with a map the of the murder site and indications of the mass graves was placed next to the main memorial. Five graves are located at a distance of 200-400 meters around the memorial. Each mass grave is marked with a stone. Four of them have a Star of David and identical inscriptions in Ukrainian saying: "Eternal memory to the innocent Soviet people who were tortured to death and shot by the German Fascist occupiers in September 1941." The fifth mass grave, located in the vicinity of Radyanske village, is indicated by a stone with a Star of David. The inscriptions on it in Ukrainian and in Yiddish read as follows: "In this place in September 1941, during the German–Fascist occupation, the mass shooting of Jews, innocent civilians, was carried out." On September 15 an annual commemoration ceremony of the Jewish victims from the ghetto is held near the memorial. Special buses take the ceremony participants to the former Shlemarka murder site, where they place flowers at the memorial and on the mass graves. There is a memorial stone at the mass grave near the former Sokulino (today Mirnyy) village. It has a Star of David and an inscription in Ukrainian that says: ""Eternal memory to the innocent Soviet people who were tortured to death and shot by the German-Fascist occupiers in September 1941." A memorial stone was placed at the mass grave between the villages of Bystrik and Khazhin. The Russian inscription on it says: "To the Soviet civilians who were killed at the hands of the Fascist executioners between 1941 and 1944."