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Commemoration of Jewish Victims

Monument to the victims of Nazi mass murder in Krasnodar.
Photo by Inna Martiskovskaya, 2013 Monument to the victims of Nazi mass murder in Krasnodar.
Photo by Inna Martiskovskaya, 2013
The International Institute for Holocaust Research at Yad Vashem Plaque at memorial to Nazi victims in Krasnodar.
Photo by Inna Martiskovskaya, 2013 Plaque at memorial to Nazi victims in Krasnodar.
Photo by Inna Martiskovskaya, 2013
The International Institute for Holocaust Research at Yad Vashem Symbolic figures on memorial in Krasnodar.
Photo by Inna Martisovskaya, 2013 Symbolic figures on memorial in Krasnodar.
Photo by Inna Martisovskaya, 2013
The International Institute for Holocaust Research at Yad Vashem

In addition to the crimes they committed against the Jewish population of Krasnodar, the Germans and their collaborators killed many non-Jews in Krasnodar. Overall 13.000 people were killed in Krasnodar and the rural areas around Krasnodar.
The city became the first place of a trial against war criminals of World War II. Eleven men accused of collaborating with the German occupiers were tried by a Soviet military tribunal between July 14 and 17, 1943. The historian Ilya Bourtman wrote that they had helped Sonderkommando 10a, which was responsible for conducting the mass annihilation in the area and, later, for exhuming and destroying the victims’ remains. Witnesses described the mass murder of the Jewish population, as well as the killing of the non- Jews in Krasnodar. Some German POWs who had been members of the Wehrmacht provided additional incriminating evidence during the trial. Eight of the collaborators were hanged; the other three were sentenced to 20 years of prison in Siberia.
20 years later, in the autumn of 1963, another trial took place in Krasnodar. Between 1962 and 1963 eight men were arrested and brought before a Soviet military court. They were also accused of collaborating with SS Sonderkommando 10a in the mass murder of Jews and other members of the civilian population, including Gypsies.
In 1962 a West German court in Munich decided to open an investigation of former SS-Obersturmbannführer Kurt Christmann. Prosecutors in Kiel and Munich began to collect information from witnesses and started a trial against Christmann in 1972. On December 19, 1980, the district court of Munich sentenced him to 10 years imprisonment for his organization of and active participation in war crimes in the Krasnodar Kray District. The German Federal Court of Justice confirmed the verdict of the Munich court in 1982.
After the war the bodies of the Jewish victims were reburied in the Jewish cemetery of Krasnodar. A memorial was erected in what used to be called the Grove of the 1st of May (and is now Chistakovsky Park), on May 9, 1975 to commemorate all the victims of the German mass murders in Krasnodar. The memorial includes a grey monument in the shape of a flame. In front of the latter are figures of a soldier, a sailor, an elderly man, a boy, and a little girl. About 10 meters from the monument is an eternal flame with a plaque with a Russian inscription that says: "To the residents of Krasnodar who were tortured to death or annihilated in gas vans, who were brutally murdered by the Hitlerite executioners between August 1942 and February, 1943."