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Visiting Info
Opening Hours:

Sunday to Thursday: ‬09:00-17:00

Fridays and Holiday eves: ‬09:00-14:00

Yad Vashem is closed on Saturdays and all Jewish Holidays.

Entrance to the Holocaust History Museum is not permitted for children under the age of 10. Babies in strollers or carriers will not be permitted to enter.

Drive to Yad Vashem:
For more Visiting Information click here

Timeline

October 1: 
The Germans enter Sudetenland.

March 15:
Germany occupies Bohemia and Moravia.

July:
"The Center for Jewish Emigration" is opened in Prague under the supervision of Adolf Eichmann.

August 11:    
The campaign for concentrating the Jews of the Protectorate in Prague commences.

September 1:
World War II breaks out. Germany attacks Poland.

October 19, 26:
The first two transports of Jews from the city of Ostrava leave for the village of Nisko near Lublin in Poland.

April 30:
The Jews of the Protectorate are ordered to hand their property over to the authorities.

August 8:
Jewish children are not eligible to study in schools in the region of the Protectorate.

June 22:
Germany attacks the USSR.

July 5:    
The Nuremberg Laws are enforced in the territories of the Protectorate. 

September 1:    
The Jews of the Protectorate are obliged to wear a yellow badge. 

October:    
All synagogues are closed by order of the Germans. 

October 16:    
A transport of Jews is sent from the Protectorate to the Lodz Ghetto. 

October 19: 
The Germans choose the city of Terezin as the site where the Jews of the Protectorate are to be detained. 

November 24:    
The spearhead unit sets off for the city of Terezin to set up the ghetto. 

December 4:    
Jakob Edelstein arrives at the ghetto. The first transports arrive at the ghetto. 

December 11:    
Germany declares war on the United States.

January 9:
A "transport" of 1,000 people is sent from Theresienstadt to the Riga Ghetto. 102 of them survive. 

January 10:
Nine youngsters are publicly hanged in the Theresienstadt Ghetto. 

January 15:
A transport of 1,000 people is sent to Riga. Fifteen of them survive. 

January 20:
The Wannsee Conference convenes, during which the organization and execution of the "Final Solution" are coordinated. 

March11, 17:
2,001 people are forcibly taken from Theresienstadt to Izbica near Lublin. Nine of them survive. 

April 1:
A "transport" of 1,000 people is sent to Trawniki. Five of them survive. 

April 18:
A "transport" of 1,000 people is sent to Rejowiec in Lublin. Three of them survive. 

April 23:
A "transport" of 1,000 people is sent to Lublin. One of them survive. 

April 25:
A "transport" of 1,000 people is sent to the Warsaw Ghetto. Nine of them survive. 

April 27:
A "transport" of 1,000 people is sent to Izbica near Lublin. One of them survive. 

April 28:
One "transport" of 1,000 people are sent to Zamosc in Poland. 5 of them survive. 

April 30:
One "transport" of 1,000 people are sent to Zamosc in Poland. 

May 9:
A "transport" of 1,000 people is sent to the Sobibor death camp. None of them survive. 

May 17:
A "transport" of 1,000 people is sent to the Majdanek extermination camp. None of them survive. 

May 25:
A "transport" of 1,000 people is sent to Lublin. One of them survives. 

May 27:
Fighters from the Czech partisan movement assassinate Reinhard Heydrich, the head of the Security Police of Nazi Germany. 

June
The Czech population is evacuated from the city of Terezin. 

June 10:
A "transport" of Jews leaves Prague for Poland in retaliation for the assassination of Heydrich. 

June 12:
A "transport" of 1,000 people is sent to Tebenice. None of them survive. 

June 13:
A "transport" of 1,000 people is sent to the Sobibor extermination camp. None of them survive. 

July:
Elderly Jews and VIPs from Germany and Austria arrive at the Theresienstadt Ghetto. 

July 14:
A "transport" of 1,000 people is sent to Minsk. Two of them survive. 

July 28:
A "transport" of 1,000 people is sent to Baranowicze. None of them survive. 

August 3:
The Germans confiscate religious and cultural objects from the Jews and stockpile them in the Jewish Museum in Prague in order to prepare an exhibition entitled: The Extinct Jewish Race. 

August 4:
A "transport" of 1,000 people is sent to Maly Trostinets. Two of them survive. 

August 20:
A "transport" of 1,000 people is sent to Riga. None of them survive. 

August 25:
A "transport" of 1,000 people is sent to Maly Trostinets. One of them survive. 

September 1:
A "transport" of 1,000 people is sent to Raasiku-Valge in Estonia. 45 of them survive. 

September 8:
A "transport" of 1,000 people is sent to Maly Trostinets. Four of them survive. 

September 19:
One "transport" of 2,000 people are sent to the Treblinka death camp. None of them survive. 

September 21:
One "transport" of 2,020 people are sent to the Treblinka death camp. None of them survive. 

September 22:
A transport of 1,000 people is sent to Maly Trostintz. One of them survive.

September 23, 26, 29:
5,984 people are sent to the Treblinka death camp. None of them survive. 

September:
The overcrowding in the ghetto reaches its peak: 58,491 Jews are incarcerated in the city. The number of dead reaches 3,941 - 131 per day. 

October 28:
The first "transports" are sent directly from Theresienstadt to Auschwitz and Treblinka.

January 20-26:  
Mass "transports" of Theresienstadt Jews are sent to Auschwitz. 

February 2:
The German Sixth Army is annihilated near Stalingrad. 

June 27:
A German Red Cross delegation visits Theresienstadt. 

September 11-18:
A first "transport" is sent to the "Family Camp" in Auschwitz-Birkenau. 

October 6:
The children of Bialystok are sent from Theresienstadt to be murdered in Birkenau. 

November 11:
A count of the Jews in the Theresienstadt Ghetto is conducted, and Jakob Edelstein is arrested for a discrepancy between the results of the count and the number of Jews registered in the card index. 

December 18:
A second "transport" is sent to the "Family Camp" in Birkenau. Edelstein, his wife Miriam and son Arieh are sent on this "transport".

February:    
The sprucing up of the ghetto begins in anticipation of the visit of the International Red Cross delegation. 

March 8-9:
The Jews of the first "transport' sent to the "Family Camp" in Birkenau are murdered. 

May 15-18:
A group of some 7,500 people are taken to the "Family Camp" in Auschwitz-Birkenau. 

June 6: 
The Allied armies land on the beaches of France - Normandy. 

June 20:    
Jakob Edelstein and his family are murdered at the Death Wall in Auschwitz. 

June 23:    
The International Red Cross Delegation arrives at Theresienstadt to examine the condition of the Jews in the ghetto. 

August and September:
The Germans shoot a propaganda movie about the Theresienstadt Ghetto. 

September 27:
Paul Epstein, chairman of the Council of Elders, is arrested and executed. 

September 28-November 25:
18,000 Jews are sent to the Auschwitz-Birkenau extermination camp. 

November 26:    
Himmler orders the cessation of the murder in the gas chambers in Auschwitz-Birkenau. 

December 15:    
Benjamin Mormelstein, formerly the vice-chairman of the Council of Elders, is appointed chairman.

January 27:
The Red Army liberates Auschwitz. 

April 6:    
Paul Donat from the International Red Cross delegation visits Theresienstadt accompanied by Adolf Eichmann. 

April 15:    
The Bergen-Belsen camp is liberated. 

May 4:    
"Czech Aid Action" - Doctors and nurses from Prague arrive at Theresienstadt.

May 9:    
The Red Army liberates the Theresienstadt Ghetto and reaches Prague. 

November:    
The last Jews leave the city of Theresienstadt.