Raisa Makarevich and her mother – Feokla Levitkaya

Ukraine

Anatoly Biriukov holds the medal and certificate awarded to his late grandmother and great-grandmotherAnatoly Biriukov holds the medal and certificate awarded to his late grandmother and great-grandmother

During the German occupation Raisa Makarevich and her mother Feokla Levitkaya gave shelter to the Roitenburd family (including two children) in their Mogilev-Podolski home, until the establishment of the city’s ghetto - where their third child was born in 1942. Raisa and her mother continued to make sure that the family received food, even during the family’s incarceration in Ghetto Mogilev-Podolski. In 1942 Raisa and her mother gave shelter to the local butcher and his daughter, and on a number of occasions during 1942 the Roitenburd family returned to the house. During the last weeks of the occupation, when the Red Army was already at the entrance to the city, the Roitenburds, fearing for their lives, were once again taken in by their saviors. The Roitenburd family stayed with Raisa and Feokla until liberation in March 1944.

After the war the Roitenburd family immigrated to Israel.

Anatoly Biriukov, the grandson of Raisa Makarevich, accepted the award on behalf of his grandmother and great-grandmother who are no longer alive. Fanya Roitenburd, one of the survivors, also took part in the ceremony.

 

This online story was made possible with the support of:

Conference on Jewish Material Claims Against Germany

The Conference on Jewish Material Claims Against Germany works to secure compensation and restitution for survivors of the Holocaust.

Since 1951, the Claims Conference - working in partnership with the State of Israel - has negotiated for and distributed payments from Germany, Austria, other governments, and certain industry; recovered unclaimed German Jewish property; and funded programs to assist the neediest Jewish victims of Nazism.