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Yad Vashem Traveling Exhibitions

No Child’s Play: Children in the Holocaust: Creativity and Play

Selected Panels from the Exhibition

Regine (Rivka) Gartenlaub-AvihailJewish refugee children from Germany, deported in December 1938 to a demilitarized zone between Hungary and Czechoslovakia“For Dear Juri on his Bar - Mitzvah, Memories of childhood and Terezin, dedicated to you by friends from Kyjov”Girl and her doll, photographed on the way to Treblinka. Of the approximately 11,000 Jews deported from Thrace and  Macedonia in March 1943, only 200 survived

“For Dear Juri on his Bar - Mitzvah, Memories of childhood and Terezin, dedicated to you by friends from Kyjov”“For Dear Juri on his Bar - Mitzvah, Memories of childhood and Terezin, dedicated to you by friends from Kyjov”

Theresienstadt was a special ghetto that the Germans established in Terezin, Czechoslovakia in November, 1941.

Jews from Czechoslovakia, Germany, Austria, Denmark and Holland were sent there. The ghetto was actually a way-station for Jews en route to the death camps. The Germans were interested in giving the ghetto the outward appearance of a town where Jews lived productive, creative lives. The ghetto population included many artists, composers, musicians, authors, and scientists. Despite overcrowding, hunger, and illness, there were widespread educational and cultural activities in the ghetto. Of 140,000 Jews who were sent to Theresienstadt, only some 19,000 survived.

Between 1942 and 1944, approximately 13,000 children were sent to Theresienstadt. The majority were eventually transported to extermination camps, and only a few hundred survived.