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Yad Vashem This Month in Holocaust History
January
January 1943, Partisans in the Vinnitsa District, Ukraine

January 1943

Partisans in the Vinnitsa District, Ukraine

Photographed here are partisans in the Vinnitsa district, in the province of Bershad, Ukraine, in January 1943: Moshe Schneider (far left), Yaacov Talis (second from the left), Ledyzanski (far right), and David Shor (second from the right).

In 1939, some 40,000 Jews lived in the Vinnitsa district of Ukraine, 33,000 of whom resided in the city of Vinnitsa itself. Before the German occupation, about half the city’s Jews fled eastward. In July 1941, units from Einsatzgruppe C reached Vinnitsa, and by September, they had murdered approximately 10,750 Jewish men, women and children. A ghetto was established in Vinnitsa in late September, where some 5000 Jews - artisans who could be put to work – were incarcerated. The majority of the Jews living in the Vinnitsa district at the time of the occupation were murdered by the end of 1941. The remaining few were murdered in 1942. Tens of artisans who were kept alive were then murdered in the spring of 1943. Ghettos were set up in the southern areas of Vinnitsa which were annexed to Transnistria. Many of the Jews of Bukovina and Bessarabia who had been deported there by the Romanians were incarcerated in these ghettos, where most of them perished.

After the liquidation of the Ilyintsy and Vinnitsa ghettos in the spring and summer of 1942, Jews fled to the forests and joined the partisans. In the forests of the Vinnitsa district, Jews banded together in their tens and hundreds and tried to fight the Germans. The existence of a Jewish partisan unit in the Vinnitsa district has been documented, as has the participation of Jewish individuals in Soviet partisan units.

The liberation of the Vinnitsa district by the Red Army began in December 1943, and ended in April 1944.

For further information about Ukraine, click here.

Yad Vashem Photo Archives, 4613/964