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Yad Vashem This Month in Holocaust History
January
January 23, 1942, Hungarian policemen and soldiers standing around the bodies of murdered Jews in Novi-Sad, Yugoslavia

January 23, 1942

Hungarian policemen and soldiers standing around the bodies of murdered Jews in Novi-Sad, Yugoslavia

On April 12, 1941, Hungarian forces entered Novi-Sad and immediately began terrorizing the Jewish and Serbian residents. Men between the ages of 16-65 were enlisted in labor battalions, some of which were sent to the front, primarily in the Ukraine, where they were forced to clear land mines, most of them dying in the process. When a small underground group operating against them was discovered, the Hungarians organized a purification action of the area. For three days, from the 21-23 of January 1942, with the city completely surrounded, cut off from the rest of the country and put under curfew, Hungarian soldiers ran wild and committed numerous atrocities. In temperatures of 20° below zero and in heavy snow, people were taken from their homes and brought to killing pits or the shores of the Danube and murdered. During the slaughter, known as the “Ratzia”, 500 Serbs and 800 Jews were murdered, including women, children and the elderly. In April 1944 the Germans rounded up all of the Jews of Novi-Sad, an estimated 1,600 people, and deported them to Auschwitz.

Yad Vashem Photo Archives, 3016/2