| Subscribe | Press Room | Store | Friends | Contact Us

יד ושם And These are Their Names... Identifying the Death March Victims Buried in a Mass Grave in Poland

Jojne Gostinski

Auschwitz no. 142023

Yona (Jojne) Gostinski was born on the 17th of March 1917 in the village of Krośniewice, Lodz region, Poland to a large, traditional family.

His parents, Eliyahu and Beylh owned a bakery, one of the five bakeries under Jewish ownership in the village. The family lived at 11 or 13 Kutnowska Street. Eliyahu and Beylh had a number of children: their eldest son Maniek was married to Ruti, another son named Hertzke was married to a girl from the village of Kowel; their other children were Yona, Yotka, Shmuel and Freida. All were murdered. Gostinski married in the Krośniewice Ghetto and had a son; his wedding was the final wedding ceremony to be conducted in the ghetto.

In 1941 Gostinski was deported from the ghetto to Küstrin forced labor camp in Poznan. On the 28th of August 1943 he was deported from Küstrin to Auschwitz. On arrival at the camp he passed the selection, received the number 142023 and became an inmate of the camp.

Gostinski was transferred to Gute Hoffnung camp in Libiąż near Auschwitz. There is a record of his admission to the camp hospital on the 14th of November 1944.

Another record from 1944 shows that Gostinski was transferred to the coal mine Janinagrube in Libiąż, a sub-camp of Auschwitz III.

In his testimony death march survivor Zenek Maor describes the murder in Mlyny and about Gostinski's murder:

"When the march neared the forest, for their amusement, two SS men threw grenades and then the march escorts began shouting "Partisans!" and shooting at the prisoners. This lasted for about five minutes. The whole field was covered with dead and wounded and amongst them was Jojne Gostinski."

The Transport
On the 28th of August 1943 800 Jews were deported to Auschwitz on an RSHA transport from Küstrin. Following the selection, 667 men received the numbers 141903 – 142569 and became inmates of the camp; the rest, 133 men, were taken immediately to the gas chambers and murdered.


Do you have additional information about this person? Contact Yad Vashem.