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יד ושם And These are Their Names... Identifying the Death March Victims Buried in a Mass Grave in Poland

Jakub Cymermann

Auschwitz no. 137433

Sign at the ghetto entrance warning against "Danger of Epidemics: Jewish Settlement Zone." The text includes details of the penalties for entering or leaving the ghetto without permission. Radom, Poland. A crowd of Jews in the Radom ghetto, Poland. Deportation of the Jews from Radom Ghetto, Poland Contemporary photograph of 8 Nowogrodzka street; the Cymermann family home prior to their being sent to the ghetto.

Jakub Cymermann was born to Chaim and Rachel in the city of Radom, Poland on the 13th of August 1892. Cymermann, a medic, was married to Mania-Maria (née Steinbock b. 25th July 1896), a teacher. On the 22nd of December 1922 their eldest son Henryk was born and their second son, Maurycy, was born on the 25th of June 1925. The family lived in Radom at 8 Nowogrodzka street.

In April 1941 the Radom ghetto was established and the Cymermann family were incarcerated within it. The ghetto was liquidated in stages and during the month of August 1942 the majority of the inhabitants were sent to Treblinka death camp . Two forced labor camps were established on the site of the ghetto

On the 23rd of August 1943 Cymermann was deported to Auschwitz from a labor camp in the Radom region. On arrival he received the number 137433 and became an inmate of the camp. He worked as a nurse in the camp hospital of Birkenau in block no. 16. Camp documents contain a record of Cymermann dated the 22nd of December 1944.

The fate of his family is unknown. It can be assumed that they were murdered in Treblinka camp together with the majority of the Jews of Radom.

The Transport
On the 23rd of August 1943 the SIPO and the SD sent a group of male and female inmates from Radom prison to Auschwitz. 766 men received the numbers 137420 – 138185 and 118 women received the numbers 54999 – 55116.


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