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Yad Vashem A Jewish Community in the Carpathian Mountains- The Story of Munkács

During the Holocaust

Artifacts

Small silver teaspoon engraved with the name of a girl, Suzy Strauss

  • Silver teaspoons engraved with the name of the young girl, Suzy
  • Photographs of the Strauss family before the war. The young girl Suzy Strauss appears in many of the pictures.'
  • Photographs of the Strauss family before the war. The young girl Suzy Strauss appears in many of the pictures.
  • Photographs of the Strauss family before the war. The young girl Suzy Strauss appears in many of the pictures.
  • Photographs of the Strauss family before the war. The young girl Suzy Strauss appears in many of the pictures.
  • Photographs of the Strauss family before the war. The young girl Suzy Strauss appears in many of the pictures.
  • Photographs of the Strauss family before the war. The young girl Suzy Strauss appears in many of the pictures.
  • Monument inscribed with the names of the Bohem-Strauss family members killed at Auschwitz, including the name of the young girl Suzy Strauss

Menachem-Max Strauss and his wife, Elizabeth (née Bohem), both born to secular established families, lived in Munkács. Menachem-Max was a senior employee at the Swiss wood and manufacturing company "Latorica" that had a branch in Munkács.

During the deportation of Hungarian Jewry in 1944, Elizabeth and her daughter Suzy were taken to Auschwitz, where they were murdered together with Elizabeth's mother. Max was seemingly taken to a labor unit where he died.

Suzy's possessions were looked after by Georgina Mayer (née Bohem), Elizabeth's sister. She managed to flee to Budapest, where she found shelter in one of the safe houses.

It is unclear how Georgina got hold of the artifacts, as she never returned to Munkács and after the war immigrated to Eretz Israel via Yugoslavia. It may be that the family's possessions were kept by neighbors who made contact with her. Georgina died in 2006. The artifacts were given to Yad Vashem by the nephew of her late husband.

The online exhibition was made possible through the generous support of:

Conference on Jewish Material Claims Against Germany

The Conference on Jewish Material Claims Against Germany works to secure compensation and restitution for survivors of the Holocaust.

Since 1951, the Claims Conference - working in partnership with the State of Israel - has negotiated for and distributed payments from Germany, Austria, other governments, and certain industry; recovered unclaimed German Jewish property; and funded programs to assist the neediest Jewish victims of Nazism.