Yad Vashem
Yad Vashem

Source A - Pischkollonne

What is a Pischkollonne? It originates from a Greek word, pisch, meaning "to run", "ko", meaning "trousers", and "lona", meaning "wet" [the actual meaning is pischen, which means "to urinate" in German slang, and Kollonne, which means a line of soldiers]. There are three different types of Pischkollonne: daytime, evening, and night.
1. A daytime Pischkollonne: this is completely ordinary and mainly occurs alone… The morning Pischkollonne is already more interesting, but it actually belongs more to the nocturnal Pischkollonne about which we will speak later…
2. The evening Pischkollonne is announced after the detective stories, at about 10 o'clock, and the entire heim goes out to take part in it, with only the lazy ones staying in their beds and either waking up at night with wet pants or running throughout the whole night.
3. Night Pischkollonne. You wake up. It's a dark night. You need to go urgently, so you pull off the warm blanket and look for the ladder. If something falls on your head, you realize that you have to crawl along a different path, and when you finally feel the ladder, you go down. Perhaps, if you're lucky, you manage to leave the room alive and only partially disabled. When you reach the toilet, you realize with horror that it's locked. You walk, no, you run in the dark to the second toilet next to the washroom. It may be a bit flooded, but you don't care. Suddenly Pepa Kremer, Jerka Frankl or some other madrich pops up from behind the corner of the balcony, and you've already got Heiseltura [toilet duty]. Since you have to go to the toilet no matter what, you decide to go out to the yard. It is a difficult path, full of the unknown… and I'll describe it in the next bulletin. I therefore advise you to buy a subscription to the next issue of Kamarad, otherwise you may not be able to get hold of it.
Bondy, "They Called It Friend", p. 75-76
Yad Vashem