Friends  |  Press Room  |  Contact Us

The International School for Holocaust Studies

The Gandel Holocaust Studies Program for Australian Educators

Press Room

Inaugural Gandel Holocaust Studies Program for Australian Educators Opens at Yad Vashem

(January 11, 2010 - Jerusalem) Twenty Australian educators are at Yad Vashem’s International School for Holocaust Studies to attend the inaugural seminar of the Gandel Holocaust Studies Program for Australian educators, which opened this week.

The educators, from across Australia, are involved in various formal and informal educational activities relating to the Holocaust. While at Yad Vashem, the group will have in depth tours of the Yad Vashem campus, including the Holocaust History Museum, and have an opportunity to meet with top experts in the field of Holocaust education and research. In addition to discussions of the history of the Holocaust, lectures and presentations on effective Holocaust education - including age appropriate methods, and the use of multidisciplinary tools - are being offered.

The program, established by the Gandel family of Melbourne, is a long-term professional development project designed to provide vital expert training to Australian educators who are active in Holocaust instruction throughout Australia. The current two-week seminar will be followed by a full-year program of training and follow up work in Australia. Prof. Emeritus Louis Waller and H.E. Ambassador James Larsen, Australian Ambassador to Israel, joined Dorit Novak, Director of the International School for Holocaust Studies at Yad Vashem, and the seminar participants at the seminar's official opening on January 10, 2010.

"By providing teachers with the practical and didactic methods needed to create a cadre of educators with the knowledge and tools for meaningful Holocaust education, the Gandel Program is a significant development in advancing Holocaust education and awareness in Australian schools," said Avner Shalev, Chairman of Yad Vashem.

Novak added, "Yad Vashem has worked with Australian educators in the past, but the new Gandel program will transform periodic seminars into a comprehensive, sustainable program. With Australia expected to mandate Holocaust education in the schools beginning in 2011, this project is perfectly timed to prepare educators to meet the challenges of meaningful, multidisciplinary Holocaust education in the new century."

Contact: Estee Yaari / Foreign Media Liaison / Yad Vashem / +972 2 644 3412/10

Yad Vashem, the Holocaust Martyrs’ and Heroes’ Remembrance Authority, was established in 1953. Located in Jerusalem, it is dedicated to Holocaust remembrance, documentation, research and education. www.yadvashem.org


"Gandel Shoah program is invaluable"

I have just returned from participating in the inaugural Gandel Holocaust Studies Program for Australian Educators at Yad Vashem in Jerusalem and I would like to take this opportunity to publicly thank the Gandel family Charitable Trust, the Adelson Family Foundation, the New South Wales Joint Committee for Jewish Higher Education and Sydney Jewish Museum for so generously supporting this valuable Holocaust education initiative.

The course itself, superbly led by Orit Margaliot (most ably supported by Dr Daniel Feldman, Richelle Budd-Caplan, Dorit Novak and Shulamit Imber) was brilliantly organised and the standard of lectures and seminars was truly outstanding - including two lectures by the world's leading historian of the Holocaust Yehuda Bauer. Participants in the course came from all over Australia, from urban and country areas and from all spheres and levels of education - whatever their level of knowledge or experience teaching the Holocaust all participants benefitted greatly from the quality of the program and the warm and friendly welcome that we received from everyone at Yad Vashem's International School for Holocaust Studies.

The Gandel Holocaust Studies Program is to be run on an annual basis and I would warmly commend anyone in Australia involved in Holocaust studies - at whatever level - to give serious consideration to applying to undertake to this course - I am certain that anyone fortunate enough to be selected to participate will not be disappointed".

Yours,
Dr Bill Anderson,
Consultant Historian,
Jewish Holocaust Museum and Research Centre,
15-17 Selwyn Street,
Elsternwick,
Vic. 3185
Ph 03-9830-4260 (Home)


Educators Israel-bound for Holocaust studies

Posted on 22 December 2009
DALIA SABLE

SCHOOL and university teachers from across Australia are setting off for Israel to take part in an intensive course designed to broaden their knowledge of the Shoah.
The members of the 20-strong delegation are participants in the inaugural Gandel Holocaust Studies Program for Australian Educators.
Conducted by the Yad Vashem International School for Holocaust Studies in Jerusalem, the initiative is a long-term course to educate and mentor the group, beginning with an intensive training seminar in Israel, followed by a year-long program back home.
“This is an extremely important initiative and we are delighted to be involved,” John Gandel said upon announcing the successful scholarship recipients.
“The participants will come home to intensify and broaden their study of the Holocaust in their work and to raise awareness of the Holocaust within their communities. We believe their visit to Israel and attendance at the Yad Vashem course will be a highlight of their professional careers and their life in general.”
Gandel Philanthropy has provided scholarships for 10 educators, with Yad Vashem sponsoring a further 10 people.
The director of the International School for Holocaust Studies at Yad Vashem, Dorit Novak, told The AJN that the group of Australians would become a part of a “cadre” of educators from around the world with “the knowledge and tools for meaningful Holocaust education”.
They would also become a part of a worldwide network able to share and exchange information about Holocaust education initiatives.
“The Holocaust is a part of the shared identity of our civilisation -– certainly part of our shared identity as Jews, but also part of the shared identity of our modern civilisation,” she said.
“Educators are in the unique position to be a part of building and strengthening the shared values that underpin our civilisation and that were undermined during the Holocaust, and can infuse it with meaning when transmitting it to their students.”
According to Novak, the Gandel Holocaust Studies Program will also enable a meaningful, long-term relationship between Australia and Yad Vashem. “Yad Vashem has worked with Australian educators in the past, but the new Gandel program will transform periodic seminars into a comprehensive, sustainable program. With Australia expected to mandate Holocaust education in the schools beginning in 2011, this project is perfectly timed to prepare educators to meet the challenges of meaningful, multidisciplinary Holocaust education in the new century.”