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Written Testimonies

Testimony in Yiddish about the murder of Jews deported to Kamenets-Podolsk Testimony in Yiddish about the murder of Jews deported to Kamenets-Podolsk YVA M.49.E/6848

Testimony of N. H. (in Yiddish)
...After Hungarian and Czech Jews collected the gold that was demanded from them, they were given two hours to get ready for the journey. They were lined up in rows in military fashion and taken to the destroyed train station. Rabbis with Toral scrolls led [this procession], followed by mothers with their children, and ill and old people supported [by others]. All the people moved along with difficulty; the majority of them believed that they were going to be returned home. They were taken to demolished barracks near the train station and were held there under guard for two days on the pretext that they were waiting for a train. On the third day they were driven out of the barracks with rubbber clubs and taken to an open field where there was a ravine surrounded by hills. There all of them were shot by SS men.
Women and children from the Kamenets-Podolsk train station area, who were living in a cellar about a kilometer from the murder site told me horror stories about the groans and cries that they heard from far away.
[The site of the massacre] was full of smoke coming from the constant shooting. Many people were thrown into the grave while still alive, some of them having been wounded only slightly.
Several days afterward, both day and night frightful noises were heard from the graves. Then SS men forced peasants from the surrounding villages to cover the graves. The railway workers said that the earth was heaving for several days.
From the letter of the Red Army soldier Semyon Faingold to his brother, 1944:
... Mother and Manya spent their last days at the former barracks of NKVD troops near the train station. Here large graves were prepared and shootings took place on Saturdays as soon as the graves were prepared.
Manya lost her children on September 10. The children were not shot, but thrown alive into the graves. The little children were torn apart...
I am standing here near one of the opened graves. Hundreds of bodies of naked men, women, and children are lying on top of each other. Some had their skulls split by blows from weapons, others had their limbs broken, still others did not have any wounds at all-they were simply buried alive.
Right here on October 31, 1942 our sweet, infinitely dear old mother walked, together with other pitiful people, on bare feet through frozen puddles. Although totally emaciated, pale from pain and humiliation, and bruised,she approached this grave and one large tear fell from her kind, tender eyes, but she did not cry. I know that. With her gaze directed into the distance, with her last look she saw you and me and begged [us] to take revenge. Then a drunken "shutzman," a traitor, grabbed her by her torn blouse and dragged her to the grave where that fascist barbarian, like an animal lacked a conscience, shot this unfortunate, totally innocent woman...
YVA O.48/273.25
Video
Bina Tenenblat, who was born in 1928 in Kamenets-Podolsk and lived in the city during World War Two
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Bina Tenenblat, who was born in 1928 in Kamenets-Podolsk and lived in the city during World War Two
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