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German Reports

The Yad Vashem Archives hold many millions of pages of documents gathered from numerous German archives (West and East).

YVA TR.3/1468

From the Eisnatzgruppen reports
September 11, 1941
Operational Situation Report USSR No. 80
Einsatzgruppe C
...in the course of 3 days 23,600 Jews were shot in Kamenets-Podolsk by a Commando of the Higher SS and Police Leader ["South"]...
YVA TR.3/1468

Military Historical Archive, Prague KDOS RF SS, copy YVA M.36/22.1

From the report of the Higher SS and Police Leader South, Friedrich Jeckeln
From the telegraph report of the Higher SS and Police Leader South Friedrich Jeckeln, August 30, 1941
...The staff company once again shot 7,000 Jews. Thus, the total number of the Jews liquidated in the operations in Kamenets-Podolsk is around twenty thousand...
Military Historical Archive Prague, KDOS RF SS, copy YVA M.36/22.2
From the interrogation of Hermann K., former member of the staff of the Higher SS and Police Leader "South" Friedrich Jeckeln, September 22, 1964:
Already on the way to the execution site Jeckeln said to L., W., and me that we should get ready. We knew that we were going to an execution. When we arrived, the execution had not yet started. Several execution squads had been formed, each of 4 men. One of the excution squads consisted of L., W., myself, and a policemen I did not know. We were armed with submachine guns, apparently Czech-made. The site of the execution was cordoned off by police units. The execution squads consisted of policemen and SS-men. The Jews came in a long procession. I, L., W., and policemen I didn't know were ordered by Jeckeln to move up to one of the graves. Jews were constantly brought to it. Some of them had to lie down, others we killed by a shot in the back of the head while they were standing. There were men, women, and children, but I only shot men. There were no breaks. I often moved away from the grave when my nerves could not stand it anymore and I tried to shirk this assignment. However, each time I was ordered to return to the grave. In toto I shot for one or two hours. Then we were replaced by a police squad. If you ask me how many Jews I shot there, I cannot tell exactly. Probably 50 or 100, I don't know.
Klaus-Michael Mallmann, Volker Riess, Wolfram Pyta, eds., Deutscher Osten 1939-1945. Die Weltanschauungskrieg in Photos und Texten, Darmstadt, 2003, pp. 86-87.
From the interrogation of Wilhelm W., former member of the 320 Order Police Battalion, January 4, 1961:
The Jews carried their possessions with them, wrapped in blankets. I spoke to some Jews. ... The Jews asked me about the destination of their journey. The Jews were convinced they were going to be resettled. At that time I myself did not know that the Jews were going to be shot. From talking to the Jews I also thought that, indeed, this was going to be a resettlement. We took the Jews out of the city. We moved about one kilometer or a bit more out of the city. I cannot say today what direction it was. We were going through impassable territory. There we encountered our cordon. We saw from far away many people standing in that area. From afar we also heard shooting from submachine guns. We took the Jews through the cordon formed by policemen. There were already several thousands Jews on the other side of the cordon. Thereafter, following orders, we reinforced the cordon. ... I still remember that about 6 Jews were kept back for the end of the shooting. These 6 Jews were ordered by Jeckeln to stand between two bomb craters. Then J[eckeln] made a short speech to us. I remember, I believe, that during his speech he pointed specifically to one Jew, who was wearing a grey suit and who made an particularly respectable impression. In very dramatic manner he referred to this Jew by name and explained accordingly: "Look at this man. He is a typical Jew who must be annihilated so that we Germans can live."
Klaus-Michael Mallmann, Volker Riess, Wolfram Pyta, eds., Deutscher Osten 1939-1945. Die Weltanschauungskrieg in Photos und Texten, Darmstadt, 2003, p. 87.
Video
Bina Tenenblat, who was born in 1928 in Kamenets-Podolsk and lived in the city during World War Two
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Bina Tenenblat, who was born in 1928 in Kamenets-Podolsk and lived in the city during World War Two
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