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Commemoration of Jewish Victims

Monument in the area of the former munitions depot, where Jews from Kamenets-Podolsk were murdered in August 1941. Photo by Eugene Shnaider, 2013 Monument in the area of the former munitions depot, where Jews from Kamenets-Podolsk were murdered in August 1941. Photo by Eugene Shnaider, 2013 Genesis Philanthropy Group project Monument to the murdered Jewish children of Kamenets-Podolsk. Photo by Eugene Shnaider, 2013 Monument to the murdered Jewish children of Kamenets-Podolsk. Photo by Eugene Shnaider, 2013 Genesis Philanthropy Group project Monument to the Holocaust victims of Kamenets-Podolsk. Photo by Eugene Shnaider, 2012  
Monument to the Holocaust victims of Kamenets-Podolsk. Photo by Eugene Shnaider, 2012
Genesis Philanthropy Group project Monument commemorating Jewish deportees from Hungary. Photo by Eugene Shnaider, 2013 Monument commemorating Jewish deportees from Hungary. Photo by Eugene Shnaider, 2013 Genesis Philanthropy Group project Mamorial stone commemorating the Jewish community of Kamenets-Podolsk that was destroyed during the Holocaust Mamorial stone commemorating the Jewish community of Kamenets-Podolsk that was destroyed during the Holocaust International Institute for Holocaust Research Yad Vashem

After the war Jews from Kamenets-Podolsk tried in several ways to commemorate their relatives who were murdered in the Holocaust. In August 1946 an attempt was made to hold a meeting to commemorate the fifth anniversary of the mass murder of the Jews of the city. The local authorities, however, categorically banned such a meeting. In July 1948 members of the Jewish community of Kamenets-Podolsk petitioned Nikolai Shvernik, the Chairman of the Presidium of the Supreme Council of the USSR, and Nikita Khrushchev, the Chairman of the Council of Minsters of the Ukrainian SSR, to allow them to publicly commemorate the Jewish victims, but to no avail.
Nevertheless, local Jews later succeeded in erecting several monuments at the murder sites of members of their community. Two monuments were erected at the site of the former munitions depot where, in late August 1941, thousands of Jews from Kamenets-Podolsk were murdered. The Russian and Yiddish inscription on the larger of the monuments reads as follows "Eternal memory to the fathers, mothers, brothers, and sisters tortured to death in a barbaric way on the 5th of Elul 3040 [sic], 1941 by the German-Fascist monsters." Jews still living in Kamenets-Podolsk still gather annually at this site to commemorate local Holocaust victims. Some of them gather according to the Hebrew date (in late August or early September), others gather on August 5, substituting the 5th of August for the 5th of Elul.
Another Holocaust monument, in the shape of a small obelisk (fenced off by chains) was erected in Kamenets-Podolsk.
In recent years two more monuments were erected in the area of the munitions depot where most of the Jews of Kamenets-Podolsk were murdered. The plaque on one has a text in Ukrainian and English that reads as follows: "23 600 men, women and children were executed here by the fascists on August 26, 27, and 28 in 1941. They were Jews - civilians of Kamianets-Podilsky and Jewish deportees from Hungary. Murdered innocents rest in peace. Your memory will always live."
Another monument, erected in 2009, commemorates the Jews deported to Kamenets-Podolsk from Hungarian-controlled Carpatho-Rus and murdered in late August 1941. The inscription in Hungarian on the plaque of this monument says: "To the Memory of our Hungarian Jewish brothers and those [of our brothers] who had sought refuge in Hungary in 1941.The Hungarian government of that time and the inhuman Nazi hatred threw them out and drove them to their death. May their memory be for a blessing. Erected in their memory by the John Wesley Humanities High School and the Hungarian Evangelical Brotherhood. 2009"
A stone commemorating the Holocaust victims of Kamenets-Podolsk was also erected at the Holocaust Memorial Park in New York.
Video
Bina Tenenblat, who was born in 1928 in Kamenets-Podolsk and lived in the city during World War Two
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Bina Tenenblat, who was born in 1928 in Kamenets-Podolsk and lived in the city during World War Two
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